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Holy Bazolie!

We had an earthquake last night!

I woke up at around 4:30 in the morning, because my windows (which are ancient) were rattling. as if there was a heavy wind, which would not have been unexpected in April. Once I was awake, though, I noticed that the bed was shaking. It was definitely the bed, and not, say, me shivering in an unexpected temperature drop. I got up and checked outside, and there was no wind. Gee, I thought, it was just as if it had been an earthquake.

Got up and checked the news. And guess what! It really was an earthquake! Centered just east of St. Louis, magnitude 5.4, which is respectable.

Holy Bazolie!

EDIT: Seems that the epicenter was actually on the other side of the state, at the Illinois-Indiana border, and that the USGS has revised it down to 5.2 in magnitude. Which is still respectable, for the Midwest.

Comments

( 23 comments — Leave a comment )
jastaelf
Apr. 18th, 2008 12:45 pm (UTC)
Good Lord... I'm glad it wasn't worse, and that you're OK!

PS: You're listening to music about my Horse?? :)

Edited at 2008-04-18 12:45 pm (UTC)
frenchpony
Apr. 18th, 2008 12:58 pm (UTC)
I'm perfectly fine, and so is the apartment. All things considered, it was kind of cool.

Only if your horse is named after a small Southern town.
jastaelf
Apr. 18th, 2008 02:59 pm (UTC)
Nope, he's named for Henry VII of England's lovely Welsh uncle, in a word-play on the fact that his father's name (like Duke Jasper's) is Owen and his mother has the name Jet, and jet and jasper look nice together on a necklace. :)

But that's nice music!! Thanks!
frenchpony
Apr. 18th, 2008 03:43 pm (UTC)
Cool story. Did you name him, or did he come with it?
jastaelf
Apr. 21st, 2008 11:32 pm (UTC)
His registered name, Prodigal Son, was chosen by the owner of Jasper's Mama, Lad's Jet Set; Kris chose the name because out of all the many babies Jet has had, Jasper was her very first boy baby (colt, as opposed to filly)! Plus she knew where he would end up, and the joke at the time was that I could be a circuit preacher when he grows up. *grins* I got to pick the pet name, also known as his "barn name".
frenchpony
Apr. 21st, 2008 11:37 pm (UTC)
Animal registries seem to like really weird names. I wonder why they wouldn't just let you name him something that a regular human being would name a horse . . . say, "Jasper," and just let that be his name.
dawtheminstrel
Apr. 18th, 2008 01:25 pm (UTC)
I heard about that, though I didn't feel it. We had a big rainstorm last night (and my windows leaked again) so it could be I just thought it was wind from that.

Cool.
frenchpony
Apr. 18th, 2008 01:34 pm (UTC)
Maybe because you're a little farther away from St. Louis than I am? I thought it was the wind, at first, but my bed does not shake in high winds. It was quite something, though. 4:30 in the morning is usually the deepest part of my sleep cycle, and it's a fairly rare thing for an external force other than the telephone in my ear to wake me at that hour. But the bed was definitely shaking. I think I was too sleepy to process that clue immediately, but the thought that it was just like an earthquake did cross my mind at the time.
elliska
Apr. 18th, 2008 04:53 pm (UTC)
Wow!! You felt that all the way where you are?! That just goes to show you how strong that earthquake was. I remember when I lived in Ky we felt a small earthquake from New Madrid and it scared the you-know-what out of me. I'll take my nice, predictable hurricanes, thank you. You can keep the earthquakes. Glad everything was ok for you.
frenchpony
Apr. 18th, 2008 08:02 pm (UTC)
The epicenter was 230 miles away from Chicago. But it seems that people felt it all up and down the country. Apparently, they've even been getting reports in from as far away as Georgia! And people in Wisconsin and Michigan got shaken awake this morning, too. Of course, I had to learn a new word in Hebrew as soon as I got to class. "earthquake" is ra'dah adamah.
dot_o_choillmor
Apr. 18th, 2008 10:05 pm (UTC)
Oh wow! That's so cool!

Says she from safely across the sea.
frenchpony
Apr. 18th, 2008 11:35 pm (UTC)
I thought it was pretty nifty, myself. I was safely in my bed, the earthquake wasn't big enough to be really dangerous, and I was too sleepy to be scared. All in all, a fine way to experience a natural phenomenon like that.
meckinock
Apr. 19th, 2008 12:32 am (UTC)
I slept through it. I'm so disgusted.
frenchpony
Apr. 19th, 2008 01:44 am (UTC)
Maybe you really needed the sleep?
meckinock
Apr. 19th, 2008 01:45 am (UTC)
Yeah, actually I did because as you noted, it was warm enough to sleep with the windows open for the first time in six months, which meant my dogs had me up most of the night getting all agitated at the critters out in the yard. So by 4:30 or whenever the earthquake happened I had finally zonked out for an hour of decent sleep.l
meggins
Apr. 20th, 2008 12:32 am (UTC)
If one must be subject to earthquakes, this is probably the way to go. A little early morning excitement and an interesting topic of discussion. However, folks nearer the epicenter might beg to differ.
frenchpony
Apr. 20th, 2008 04:53 am (UTC)
Totally agreed. I was talking on the phone with Mom Pony, and we both decided that this was the best possible way to experience an earthquake -- safe in bed, and too sleepy to be scared.

Apparently, there weren't any serious injuries, even near the epicenter. There was some minor property damage, but that was about it.
perelleth
Apr. 20th, 2008 02:43 pm (UTC)
hehehehe.. welcome to the world of roller coasters....
frenchpony
Apr. 20th, 2008 02:49 pm (UTC)
See, when you write about an earthquake, that's just daily life. But I live in Illinois, a region not exactly known as an earthquake hot point. Part of what was so fun about this was that nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition earthquakes in a place like Chicago.

The other thing was that people felt it as far away as Georgia (which is pretty far). The USGS says that the crust along the Wabash Fault is so old that it reacts differently than the crust along the Ring of Fire. Apparently, older crust really rings like a bell when a rare earthquake happens. It wasn't that big, as earthquakes go, but it was widespread for its magnitude.
perelleth
Apr. 20th, 2008 03:05 pm (UTC)
Wow! that was very far indeed! And it is impressive how the atmosphere changes before and after.
frenchpony
Apr. 20th, 2008 03:22 pm (UTC)
I didn't notice much in the way of atmospheric changes, but that's probably because it's the middle of spring, and the weather changes so often anyway, and also that the earthquake happened at 4:30 in the morning, which is not usually a time that I'm observing the atmosphere.
perelleth
Apr. 20th, 2008 03:26 pm (UTC)
snarky pony! :-)
If it gets a habit, you will see that you get to recognize the symptoms even if it happens at night...
frenchpony
Apr. 20th, 2008 04:37 pm (UTC)
In Illinois, it probably won't get to be a habit. But if I ever move to a place where it is a habit, I shall keep an eye out for the symptoms. Any pointers?
( 23 comments — Leave a comment )